3 Times You Definitely Need a Brand Partnership Agreement

 
 
3 Times You Definitely Need a Brand Partnership Agreement
 
 
 

It’s always an exciting day when a brand thinks you’re cool enough to partner up with.

 

While this might not be on the level of Louis Vuitton x Supreme, brand partnerships are valuable because they bolster your image as well as provide more resources for creative collaborations.

If a brand is asking you to do any of these three things, you need a brand partnership agreement stat:


1.  You’re attending an event held by a brand.

The brand’s wining and dining you over email with the promise of an Insta-worthy evening with free products, food, and networking opportunities. All you have to do is take go live on Instagram Stories or Tweet about how @(insert name) is the best brand ever!

Hold up. What you’re doing is actually creative labor, and this brand is trying to get your influence to do the marketing work for them. Before you post anything onto your social media channels, you’ll want to figure out what the brand wants from you and what you’ll receive in return (AKA exposure doesn’t count as compensation).


2.  You’re posting anything for a brand (even for free).


Spell out the brand partnership in as much detail as possible, including whether there are any project milestones or post requirements. Does the brand need to sign off on the post or do you maintain creative control? 

Likewise, can you delete the post because it’s ruining your Instagram feed or do you have to leave it up for all posterity?

Is this post really a 5-second snap-and-post or a video that requires extensive editing? Even if you’re receiving free product in exchange for promotion, Spell. Out. your. Agreement.


3.  You’re creating content for another brand.


One thing we absolutely hate is seeing creatives get shafted and pressured to do work for free. Yes, we’re talking about those big-name brands who only promise you exposure in exchange of hours of editing, writing, and social media work.

First off, it’s important to determine who is creating the content and who owns it? This matters for purposes of copyrighting, trademarking, and reposting the content. Make this delineation very clear because intellectual property rights are incredibly valuable.
 

     
     

     

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